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The Challenges Facing Our Education System

On the Diplomacy In The Making and More website, we provide information about the challenges facing the U.S. education system:

  • Teacher Shortages
  • State and local funding
  • Contract negotiations
  • Classroom Sizes
  • Children in public and more

To share your thoughts about the future of education in our country, call us today!

Since the restrictions have been lifted around the country, resuming American pastime is becoming the focal point of today. More and more Americans are feeling safer, and consequently eating out; visiting parks; going to the beach are no longer restricted for the most part.

For nationwide restaurant chains and independent eateries are saying that there is a growing demand for workers; and frankly aren’t enough workers to staff kitchens and dining rooms just as Covid-19 restrictions relax and more consumers want to eat out again.

For example, fast food operators like owners of Jimmy John’s Gourmet Sandwiches and restaurants are offering signing bonuses for recruits. Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. is offering perks such as free college tuition to employees who work at least 15 hours a week after four months on the job. Other fast-food chains like Taco Bell is offering paid family leave to company store managers while MacDonald’s Corp owners are assessing what pay and benefits its U.S. employers would like as a best place to work.

Atlanta-based restaurant operator Daniel Halpern, who runs fifty TGI Fridays and other restaurants recently increased hourly wages and is offering employees immediate pay.

During the pandemic, U.S. restaurants shifted their store operations to online launching online food brands or rely on takeout services. Sales at bars and restaurants increased up to 13.4% in March compared with the month of February, according to U.S. Labor Department.

Despite of Chipotle fast-food chain offering its college tuition initiative, servers, hosts and line cooks are reluctant to come back because they are fearful to contract Covid-19; have moved on to other industries or remain on unemployment benefits.

Other sectors of the U.S. economy also are struggling to add staff especially with manufacturers, live-event coordinators [in entertainment] and other companies wresting with labor shortages. Some restaurant owners have had to pass on some of the increases to customers in the form of higher prices as other prices rises at the same time— operation and overhead, for example. Consequently, consumer fast-food prices in March grew to 6.5% compared to last year, biggest year-on- year since 1998, the Labor Department data show. It was also reported McDonalds and Pizza Hut owners are closing earlier in the evening than if they were fully staffed, cutting off potential sales.

Food-service jobs on Indeed.com cited mid-April jobs stood at 16.2% higher than February fiscal year 2020 reflecting the highest number for severs, cooks, hosts and managers and other restaurant jobs posting since the pandemic began spreading in the U.S.

However, restaurants were struggling with employment before the pandemic when unemployment stood at 3. 5%; Covid-19 created new problems restaurateurs said. Many restaurant and bar workers were laid off when the pandemic hit last year. Economists expect it would take time for workers who dropped out of the market to return.

New York City, some restaurants are closing earlier due to labor shortage according to report on April 11 by McDonald’s. It is reported supplemental unemployment benefit of $300 a week could be reason for workers to return to work according to economists and restaurant owners as federal and average state unemployment payments can surpass thew weekly pay of an employee working 40 hours at $15 an hour. The median hourly wage for a fast-food worker in 2020 stood at $11.47, Law Department data show. However, restaurants like full service and high-end restaurant Wolfgang Puck’s Spago-Beverly Hills, servers earns as much as $100,000 a year plus tips are also struggling to recruit workers. Mr. Puck said in an interview that expended unemployment benefits and new options like personal chef gigs are contributing to staffing shortages at Spago and other restaurants .

Mon. Mar. 22, 2021

Mon. Mar. 22, 2021

Schools that have been open for months are learning lessons

Some administrators and teachers where their buildings have been opened for months have come to some hard earned conclusion of how to make it works. They have learned in consistent of what the scientists have been touting –masking, distancing, ventilation and regular testing when possible are effective ways to reduce transmission of Covid-19 in schools. However, daily temperature checks and deep-cleaning surfaces have become low priorities.

They also learned that teachers, not their students are the primary transmitters of the virus in grade schools that most students are likely at risk of infection during lunch time and that tools such as portable air cleaners, and carbon dioxide monitors can help lower the transmission of infections.

They say while implementing a hybrid school plan where the classes are split between classroom and home may actually be more riskier in somes than full-time in-person classes because children are potentially exposed to more people. And, it is like fine to be 3 feet apart from each other instead of 6 feet, something that the CDC noted when it changed its guidelines on Friday.

It is noted that a speedy vaccine rollout could mean most schools will be back to full-time in-person classes by fall at long as community transmission is in check and schools adhere to the proper safety protocols. It is predicted that children age 12 and over will be eligible for the vaccine by the fall public-health officials say. Children may be able to start school year vaccinated.

For instance , in Marietta City Schools district in Georgia Dr. Grant Rivera, schools superintendent of schools believed that the virus was primarily spread on desk, doorknobs, and high school students chatting with each other in hallways, CDC said that this was not the case, but was getting a foothold because of poor physical distancing, among teachers and students as well as inadequate mask-wearing.

At Marietta City Schools district, the transmission of the virus was among teacher and students often occuring during meeting and lunches said CDC and subsequently spread to the classroom

This is main reason teacher are recommended to get vaccinated. However, CDC say that it is still possible to reopen schools safely without teachers getting vaccinated if major safety measures are in place. Teachers no have vaccination priorities in most states.

US Educational News

Tue. Mar. 9, 2021

High Schools will reopen for in- person instruction in the nation’s largest district

The nation’s largest school district– New York City will reopen half of its city’s 488 high schools for full-time instructions for most or all their in-person students starting on March 22. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Monday that this is a major milestone in the city’s sometimes haltering efforts to resume in-person instruction for some of its one million students.

While some instruction in other cities in the Northeast and many on the northwest coast remains completely remote for high school and some in elementary school students. New York’s decision to bring high school students, a vast majority of them low-income Latino and Blacks will be viewed as an important precedent.

Meisha Porter, the new chancellor will face her first major task in reopening high schools. Ms. Porter will take over from the outgoing chancellor Richard A. Carranza on March 15. The city will also restart high schools sports for all students and for those who decided to learn remotely next month. High school sports season will extend through the summer this year rather than ending with the academic school year, and there are required to wear masks at all times.

As many as 55,000 high school student signed up for in-person classes last September and haven’t been back in classroom since November, and out of a total population of 282,000 high school students—only about a third of all city students will be receiving in-person instruction. The remaining 700,000 or so students in the entire city system have chosen to receive instruction remotely largely in part because of concerns about the health risks of the coronavirus. Currently, those who signed up for in-person classes last fall will report to the classroom.

In other large school districts, particularly Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Chicago and Seattle, thousands of high school students have not received any in-person instruction for the past year, and may not regain access to their classroom for months. While some large districts in the South such as Houston, Miami, Broward County in Florida are open for all grades. Other districts are focusing on bringing elementary school students back first because remote learning is particularly challenging for younger children and because research data have found that in-person learning can be safer with younger children than older ones.

Although many high school students in New York and across the country have struggled with shuttered at home; suffering immensely with social isolation of remote learning, some districts are seeing higher than average level of suicides largely in part unable to see their friends or connect-face-to fact with their teachers. Consequently, a decision to bring high schoolers back into the classrooms most likely lower suicide rate; allow some graduating students to reunite is a welcoming opportunity for the Mayor de Blasio who has made reopening schools his top priority during the pandemic.

Mr. de Blasio said in a news conference on Monday that parents and educators should expect a full return to school come fall.

“We are bringing our schools back fully in September, period, he said during a news conference.”

US Educational News

Mon. Mar. 1, 2021

San Francisco School Board comes under fire

The process of reopening public schools has sparks flying between parents and San Francisco Public School Board members contending it has given priority to social justice-issues over over getting their kids back into classroom. It was reported that two parents launched a recall of three members of the board including the president and vice president while other parents is considering options to eliminate school board altogether.

When schools were ordered to shutter in Mid-march across the nation due to COVID-19, the San Francisco Public Schools, teachers’ union and the district began negotiations on how it might reopen schools safely. However, they negotiating process came to a repasse despite the San Francisco low rate of Covid-19 for a major city.

Patrick Woff, one of the parent who formed the Campaign for Better San Francisco Public Schools makes point to how parents and teachers have made joint efforts to keep the Covid levels low, while schools have been closed throughout the year.

While school districts across the country have grappled with when to safely reopen for in-person instructions, many districts have become embroiled in debates with parents, teachers’ unions and others.

With many of the school districts coming under fire, the San Francisco Public School district is the most challenging. Under state guidelines, public schools have been allowed to open since last September, But the teachers’ unions have said they will return only when the community spread of Covid-19 is lower, or after teachers are vaccinated and school board won’t forced their hand. Such interaction angered many parents and Mayor London Breed who office doesn’t have direct control over schools.

So, on Feb 3, the city sued the school district alleging it violated state law by not putting forward a viable reopening plan. At the same time District Superintendent Vincent Matthews said the city should have offered to collaborate to resolve rather than turn to the court to resolve.

Mayor Breed and parents also accused the school board of becoming distracted by putting efforts on social issues associated with racism, sexism and slavery. Jennifer Sey, a parent that was working on recall efforts said that the board seems more focused on symbols of equity rather than actual equity which would mean getting schools open for children in San Francisco.

The board whose focus were more on slavery and racism, voted on Jan. 26 to rename 44 schools, including George Washington and Abraham Lincoln high schools and an elementary school named after former San Francisco major and current Sen. Dianne Feinstein.

The process of renaming the school began in 2018 had been criticised by parents as arbitrary, uninformed–excluding parents and community members. As such, Ms. Breed publicly rebuked such action, saying “To hear that the District is focusing energy and resources on renaming schools –schools that they haven’t even opened —is offensive.

After the potential recall efforts swelled, the School board president. Gabriela López said that she cancelled renaming committee meetings and apologized for how the board handled the renaming process and wrote a statement that “opening will be our only focus until our children and young people are back in schools.

As result, parents who formed the Campaign for Better San Francisco Public Schools said it would raise money to support three potential options: a recall campaign, new candidates in next year’s school board election or a ballot proposal to give power to appoint school board members to a city official, possibly the mayor than to elect them.

US Educational News

Fri. Feb. 12, 2021

Biden’s education pick will “reopen schools”

Miguel Cardona, President-elect Joe Biden’s nominee for Secretary of Education, speaks during a news conference in Wilmington, Del., on Dec. 23 Taken from GETTY IMAGES

Miguel Cardona, the commissioner of education in Connecticut, advanced closer to the next U.S. education secretary Thursday, putting him a step closer to guiding the reopening of more schools announced by the White House this week. Cardona won praise from Democrats and Republicans on the Committee on the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. Members voted 17-5 in favor of approval, and the Senate is expected to do the same.

Mr. Cardona take the helm as U.S. Secretary of Education during fraught time debating about reopening K-12 classrooms have pitted teachers, administrators, school boards and parents against each other. Cardona will be tasked with colleges lack of federal funding, the growing of student debt loans and online learners’ struggles to keep up.

With Congress debating an enormous coronavirus package proposed by President Biden, if passed would allocate $130 billions to schools. Mr. Cardona know what it’s like to be poor growing up in a housing project in Meriden, Connecticut with his Puerto Rican parents. His personal and professional experiences as a former teacher, administrator in nearly all grades K-12 and higher education. He also is the father of school-aged children.

Although the federal government role in local education matters is limited, Cardona would have the broad oversight powers can set the tone for what is important.

US Educational News

Tue. Feb. 9, 2021

President of the American Federation of teachers Union is hopeful in returning to in- person classrooms

President Biden wants schools to reopen within his first 100 days. Randi Wiengarten of the American Federation of Teachers [AFT] is president of the most powerful teachers union wants to get students back into the nation’s classrooms. With new variant of COVID pandemic and the anniversary quickly approaching, and a new president, Wiengarten will face truth, liberal cities and suburbs where schools are mostly to remain closed and teachers unions are the most powerful forces are saying “no not yet.”

Not before teachers vaccination, upgrade of school ventilation systems, or accommodation for educators are who the most vulnerable to COVID-19.

Teachers in Chicago teachers’ union had grounded reopening to a halt before reaching an agreement Sunday with Mayor Lori Lightfoot avoid a strike and agreeing to return K-8 grade students in March.

This week in Philadelphia, the teachers’ union is threatening to refuse to enter school buildings. In California, a conflict between Dem. Governor Gavin Newsom to lashing out saying ” If everybody has to be vaccinated, we might as well just tell the people the truth that there will be no in-person instruction in the state of California,” he said.

With this in mind, Ms. Weingarten is in a “tight spot” as president of American Federation of Teachers with a labor force of 1.7 union members strong. She and President Biden will be tasked to get buyin of 3,000 locals with a situation of 10 months, tens of millions of children had no access to inperson public education.

Of young children unable to learn by virtual screens while low income student without reliable home access to Internet, and those with disabilities and other vulnerable groups hit the hardest from limit access or lack of academics and and social services only schools can provide.

Despite of such circumstances, Ms. Weingarten believes that students returning to in-person classrooms can be done. “Even before teacher are widely vaccinated, provided certain conditions are met such as in-school virus testing and ventilation systems. Ms. Weingarten said that she needs a little more time to bring in rank and file, that is additional staff or workforce to support schoolwide operations.

Reluctantly, teachers don’t trust that there will be soap and running water available in schools as sometimes there haven’t been. They don’t trust that there will be enough funding for masks, hand sanitizer and nurses because for many years budgets were cut leaving teachers to oftentime buying needed supplies.

When president Trump was in office he told teachers to go back to work last summer, but refuse to take aggressive action to control the pandemic. Consequently, teachers were furious. Some protested with signs which featured “coffins” saying that they could not teach if they were dead while other say they would strike if forced to work in person pending on the 14-day stipulation that included zero new coronavirus cases.

To return to in-person classrooms, teachers and students need to feel safe; that their lives are not put at risk of COVID infections. The Biden administration can make it possible for both teachers and students are vaccinated and provisions are ensured.

US Educational News

Fri. Jan. 29, 2021

Is Changing Schools names the Real Issue?

Since statues and monuments have become key elements that sparked both conversation and protest nationwide– conversation about changing schools’ names is creating a spark with the Board of Education in San Francisco. The decision is wo wipe out one-third of the city’s school names including one honoring Washington, Jefferson and Lincoln have struck a nerve.

In San Francisco, the Board of Education voted to change the names of public schools with such names because they are associated with “slave ownership” Twelve hours after the Board of Education voted to changing the names, Mayor London Breed lashed out at the decision. Let’s bring the same urgency and focus on getting our kids back in the classroom, and then we can have that longer conversation about the future if schools names, she said.

To even make it more nerve striking, the San Francisco Chronicle editorial board, which wrote that members of the Board of Education had “largely quit the education business and rebranded themselves as amateur historians.”

The 6-1 decision by the board came late on Tuesday, when they voted by Zoom to remove the names of those “who engaged in the subjugation and enslavement of human beings; or who oppressed women inhibiting social progress ; or whose actions led to genocide , or otherwise significantly diminished the opportunities of those among us to the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

On the list were schools named George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Francis Scott Key, for their ownership of slaves: Abraham Lincoln, for the 1862 execution of 38 Dakota tribesmen, and Dianne Feinstein,California’s Senior Senator because of a stolen Confederate flag outside City Hall was replaced in 1984 when she was mayor of San Francisco.

Other names slated for delegation: President Herbert Hoover, John Muir, the naturalist and author; James Russell Lowell, an abolitionist poet and editor; Paul Revere, the Revolutionary War figure; Robert Louis Stevenson, the author. The Board have not decided on new names and says it welcomes suggestions.

Conversations by parents on social media sparked anger [spread though the right-wing news sites] that name changes were announced just as they received an email from the district saying it was unlikely that student would return for in-person learning this coming year–echoing the same sentiment Mayor Breed previously mentioned.

US Educational News

Fri. Dec. 4, 2021

The First Kid of the Year Gitanjali Roa–the

youngest scientist featured on the Cover of

TIME Magazine

The 16- year scientist and inventor Gitanjali Roa from Denver Colorado is named “first the Kid of the Year” featured on the cover of New York Times Magazine. Next to Greta Thurburg who earned recognition as a teenage advocacy for Climate Change, Ms. Roa is this year’s recipient for her inventing a Technology app that detect cyber-bullying. The device also can detect lead in drinking. Gitanjali Roa, was selected from a field of 5,000 US-based nominee and whittled down to five finalists by a young committee alongside comedian and TV presenter Trevor Noah.

She and the other four finalists will be honored in a TV Special on next Friday. In an interview by film actor and humanitarian Angelina Jolie, Gitanjali said, “I don’t look like your typical scientist. Everything I see on TV is that it’s an older, usually white, man as a scientist. She also told Angelina Jolie that she has shift goal from create a device to solve the world’s to inspiring others like her to explore and create their own invention as she has done. While there are not many people like her who are inspired to save the world’s problem, she is hoping through her experience, her message to solve the world’s problem will motivate them to do the same.

New York Time has awarded its man of the year honored on the cover of New York times in 1921, its best person of the year featuring 16- year old Greta Thunburg and adding its first Kid of the Year

US Educational News

Thu. Dec. 3, 2021

Commentary–Could COVID-19 happened to teach a lesson– “Put people in their rightful places?”

 

During Trump Administration, the nation as well as the world got to witness unprecedented events and challenges that occurred shifting or replacing White House of Staff; creating miscommunication with the military leaders at the Pentagon and Department of Homeland Security.

When Donald J Trump assumed the Office of President, the Republican House Senate and House Democrats gradually fell totally under control of the White House Administration. However, history records that there are separation of powers, the Executive Branch, Judiciary Branch, the House of Senate and House of Democrats in conjunction with House of Representatives and Congress. Each branch has its [own] power to act accordingly, under the United States Constitution. However, these powers appeared to have changed from this process to “absolute” power or authority. At this point, it is imperative to remember the founding fathers had divine insight to write the document, to seal it by signing into law. This document was called the United States Constitution.

Based these laws and principles, allowed the American people the right to elect leaders i.e. senators and state representatives to go to Washington to speak on behalf of the people, and to ensure welfare of the people is first.

While each state votes on senators whether Republican or Democrat, the Commander-and-chief [Elect] selects his White House chiefs of staff and advisors, and cabinet to vote on. The role of U.S. secretary of education is critically important because the person has sworn to oversee its nation public education system, to execute the laws, practices and guidelines in states and communities.

A review of historic events is noted because it leads to the nomination of Betsy DeVos in January 2017. Ms. DeVos was President Donald Trump’s nominee for secretary of education. She told lawmakers at her confirmation hearing about the threat of grizzly bears roaming freely in Wyoming and she justified her reasoning to equip schools with guns questioned by Sen. Chris Murphy [D-Conn] who had made gun control a priority after the massacre at the Sandy Hook Elementary School. DeVos won confirmation in the appointment of education secretary. While education secretary, DeVos pushed for $5 billion toward credit scholarship for private school. Her view was public education money should follow students to wherever learning model their parents prefer whether it’s traditional public school, a charter school, a private school or home school. Tooting her agenda “education freedom campaign” that pushed for implement a private school voucher program didn’t materialize.

DeVos was able to convince Congress to expand 529 plans to enabling state-sponsored colleges savings account to cover private schools tuition. She was able to convince lawmakers to reauthorize a program offering private school vouchers to student in Washington. However, DeVos was able to get backing on reversing policies from President Barack Obama administration that she claimed gave the federal government outsized role in education regarding civil rights. She rolled back changes in guidelines that centered on reducing disparities in student discipline rates, her argument they made campuses less safe. She pushed for policy changes concerning Title IX, the law protecting people from sexual based discrimination in education, She revoked Obama-era guidance which she said negated due process rights of college students accused of sexual assault. On college level, she rolled back several federal rules meant to protect students who borrowed federal money to pay for their education. She pushed to limit federal funding to colleges whose programs provided “gainful employment” meant to protect students from wasting their time and money enrolling in programs that don’t lead to gainful employment.

Based on the number of rollbacks made and experience prior qualifications, one could perceived that Ms. DeVos wasn’t the “right fit” for the job. This could be reasons why President-elect Joe Biden want the person that he nominates to has been a public school teacher. Right now, Mr. Biden is planning to scrap some of the changes made by Ms. DeVos.

US Educational News

Tue. Dec. 1, 2020

New York City Mayor announces to reopen schools in December

New York City mayor Bill De Blasio announced reopening of public elementary schools after being criticized about putting economic issues first before the children. The children have been on virtual learning since the beginning of the academic school year [August and September]. Calling a halt to in-person learning for children across the U.S. is believed to have done significant damage to children’s education, social and mental health.

Middle school and high school will remain closed. Parent has been given the option of sending their children back to school five day a week ending the hybrid learning system for some city schools.

Some students who have already signed up for in-person learning will be eligible About 190,000 in grades and city school will going back next week. It was reported some 335,000 students have already signed up for in-person classes.

Mr. De Blasio said children from pre-K and elementary school can return starting December 7. However, children who have complex disabilities can return on December the 10. Also reopening elementary schools will pose health threats as data reveal over a seven day period, 3.9 percent of children tested positive.

New York Governor Andrew Como has been at odds with De Blasio saying that children’s safety in returning to school should be top priority. However, due to the spike of the second pandemic in recent weeks, Mr. Como is supporting the mayor’s plan to reopen the school, but safely.

Since the spike of the virus, some cities such as Philadelphia have delayed plan for reopening schools while Los Angeles do not yet have a plan to reopen schools. Many children have not been in school since March. And it is unclear as to how many children will return to school before the vaccine is distributed. Despite of such drawbacks, Mr. De Blasio plans to make New York the first big city in the country to fully reopen its public school system.

Just last week, Phizer has announced that they are waiting for FDA approval. They also have ing assured as soon as the vaccine is approved, it will be able to start distribution starting with doctors and nurses, followed by vulnerable population most susceptible the virus such as older people and those already hospitalized with Covid-19.

It is also imperative that children should be included as well. While going back to in-person classes, children’s parents need to play key role that their children will be given the vaccine. They could encourage their children by making appointments with their primary care physician or bring their child or children into Health Department. Parent could be a role model by getting the vaccine with their children, to show them not to be afraid of the vaccine.

Virus-Related School Closures could put students a year behind

While the nation is under turmoil amid COVID-19 crisis, the learning gaps between race and class is predicted to widen from a disrupted academic learning among children in public schools in America, and the size of the gaps schools will be asked to fill when they reopen.

Research indicates by September; most students will have fallen behind where they would have been if they had remained in classrooms with some losing an equivalent of a full school’s year worth of academic learning. Racial and socioeconomic achievement gaps will most likely widen because of disparities in access to computers, home Internet connections and direct instruction from teachers.

The disparities in students’ achievement will grow even more if schools continue to teach fully or partly online in the fall if schools reopen with significant budget cuts because of economic downturn. Researchers predicts high school dropout rates could increase while younger children could miss out on fundamentals concepts in phonics and mathematical fractions that are essential concepts for preparing children for a lifetime of learning and working.

Danielle Gandy of South Los Angeles has spent many hours guiding/monitoring her child Cadynce who is six- year- old via online meetings and assignments provided by her charter school. After working with Cadynce for many hours, Ms. Gandy is concerned about her child’s progress in Math. “Looking at the work the teacher has done, “I applaud her,” Ms. Gandy said, but it’s maybe a fraction of what they would be learning if they were in an actual school setting,” she added.
Other teachers across the nation also worry. Mr. Clint Silva, a seventh grade Social Studies teacher in Aurora, Colorado outside of Denver was planning to spend the spring working with his students on research skills. For one remote assignment, he asked his students to create a primary source about the pandemic that future historian could consult. The main challenge that Mr. Silva student face is that they have not consistently engaged in remote assignments.

Other challenges are; students are not receiving traditional grades and [some] parent are working outside the home while others are not tech savvy and unable to help them with online schooling. Mr. Silva said, “ We know that this isn’t a good way to teach. We want to hold kids accountable. We want to see their progress, be in the classroom with them and see them struggle and overcome that. Instead, we are logging in for an hour a day, and kids are turning their cameras off and staying quiet and not talking to us.”

Due to recent suspension of regular standardized testing, some research uses past disruptions to learning such as natural disasters or summer break to project the potential impact of current crisis. Other studies look at schools that use online learning software before the coronavirus shutdown, and check to see how students performed using the same program from home.

However, such learning method only provide a fraction of student’s achievement in learning; thus, the average student could begin the next school year having lost as much as a third of expected learning progress from the previous year in reading and half of the expected progress in Math, according to a working paper from NWEA, a nonprofit organization and scholars at Brown University and the University of Virginia.

Looking at race disparities, an analysis of 800,000 students conducted by researchers at Brown and Harvard looked at how Zearn, an online Math program was used both before and after schools closed in March. It found that through late April, student progress in Math decreased by about half in classrooms located in low-income ZIP codes and not all in classrooms in high-income ZIP codes.

When all of the impacts are taken into account, the average student could fall seven months behind academically, while Blacks and Hispanic students could experience even greater learning losses, equivalent to 10 months for Black children and nine months For Latinos, according to an analysis from McKinsey & Company, the consulting group.

There are several reasons low-incomes, Black and Hispanic students appear to be suffering the most through the crisis. The Center on Reinventing Public Education. A think-tank is planning totg release an analysis of the pandemic policies of 477 school districts. It found that only a fifth have required live teaching video, and that weathy school districts were twicw as likely to provide such teaching as low-income districts.

While almost every school has provided assignments for student to complete independently, it does not necessarily means that teachers conducted the remote lessons; thus schools with many poor students sometimes chose to relax instructional expectations on teachers because they knew didn’t have reliable access to home computers or Internet connections able to stream video.

Denial of a Professor Tenure, sparks a Debate Over Ethnic Studies

While the nation is under turmoil amid COVID-19 crisis, the learning gaps between race and class is predicted to widen from a disrupted academic learning among children in public schools in America, and the size of the gaps schools will be asked to fill when they reopen.

Research indicates by September; most students will have fallen behind where they would have been if they had remained in classrooms with some losing an equivalent of a full school’s year worth of academic learning. Racial and socioeconomic achievement gaps will most likely widen because of disparities in access to computers, home Internet connections and direct instruction from teachers.

The disparities in students’ achievement will grow even more if schools continue to teach fully or partly online in the fall if schools reopen with significant budget cuts because of economic downturn. Researchers predicts high school dropout rates could increase while younger children could miss out on fundamentals concepts in phonics and mathematical fractions that are essential concepts for preparing children for a lifetime of learning and working.

Danielle Gandy of South Los Angeles has spent many hours guiding/monitoring her child Cadynce who is six- year- old via online meetings and assignments provided by her charter school. After working with Cadynce for many hours, Ms. Gandy is concerned about her child’s progress in Math. “Looking at the work the teacher has done, “I applaud her,” Ms. Gandy said, but it’s maybe a fraction of what they would be learning if they were in an actual school setting,” she added.
Other teachers across the nation also worry. Mr. Clint Silva, a seventh grade Social Studies teacher in Aurora, Colorado outside of Denver was planning to spend the spring working with his students on research skills. For one remote assignment, he asked his students to create a primary source about the pandemic that future historian could consult. The main challenge that Mr. Silva student face is that they have not consistently engaged in remote assignments.

Other challenges are; students are not receiving traditional grades and [some] parent are working outside the home while others are not tech savvy and unable to help them with online schooling. Mr. Silva said, “ We know that this isn’t a good way to teach. We want to hold kids accountable. We want to see their progress, be in the classroom with them and see them struggle and overcome that. Instead, we are logging in for an hour a day, and kids are turning their cameras off and staying quiet and not talking to us.”

Due to recent suspension of regular standardized testing, some research uses past disruptions to learning such as natural disasters or summer break to project the potential impact of current crisis. Other studies look at schools that use online learning software before the coronavirus shutdown, and check to see how students performed using the same program from home.

However, such learning method only provide a fraction of student’s achievement in learning; thus, the average student could begin the next school year having lost as much as a third of expected learning progress from the previous year in reading and half of the expected progress in Math, according to a working paper from NWEA, a nonprofit organization and scholars at Brown University and the University of Virginia.

Looking at race disparities, an analysis of 800,000 students conducted by researchers at Brown and Harvard looked at how Zearn, an online Math program was used both before and after schools closed in March. It found that through late April, student progress in Math decreased by about half in classrooms located in low-income ZIP codes and not all in classrooms in high-income ZIP codes.

When all of the impacts are taken into account, the average student could fall seven months behind academically, while Blacks and Hispanic students could experience even greater learning losses, equivalent to 10 months for Black children and nine months For Latinos, according to an analysis from McKinsey & Company, the consulting group.

There are several reasons low-incomes, Black and Hispanic students appear to be suffering the most through the crisis. The Center on Reinventing Public Education. A think-tank is planning totg release an analysis of the pandemic policies of 477 school districts. It found that only a fifth have required live teaching video, and that weathy school districts were twicw as likely to provide such teaching as low-income districts.

While almost every school has provided assignments for student to complete independently, it does not necessarily means that teachers conducted the remote lessons; thus schools with many poor students sometimes chose to relax instructional expectations on teachers because they knew didn’t have reliable access to home computers or Internet connections able to stream video.

A Need for New Education Strategy: Current One Just Isn’t Working’: PISA Test Scores Cast Doubt on U.S. Education Efforts

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos

Perhaps, the educational system may need adopt Common Core Standard curriculum nationwide in teacher training and the distribution of quality instructional material to focus on high rich content that interest students and address their needs. For example, classroom instructions should address the population of students and families who are poor. Such population is recent immigrants who have learning needs providing the support of teachers, social workers, and support educators/translators.

According to recent PISA test was given in 2018 to 600,000 to a 15-year old age group in 79 education systems around the world—public and private schools students. In the United States a demographic population sample of 4,800 students from 215 school were administered the test which is given every three years. Test assessments mainly centered on questions in reading. Students were asked to determine or identify if written evidence supported a particular claim, and to distinguish between fact and opinion, among other related tasks.

The PISA revealed top performers in reading from four provinces of China—Beijing, Shanghai, Jiangsu and Zhejiang with Singapore, Macau, Hong Kong, Estonia, Canada, Finland and Ireland who outperformed the United States. The United Kingdom [UK], Japan and Australia performed similarly to the United States

The top performers in reading were four provinces of China — Beijing, Shanghai, Jiangsu and Zhejiang. Also outperforming the United States were Singapore, Macau, Hong Kong, Estonia, Canada, Finland and Ireland. The United Kingdom, Japan and Australia performed similarly to the United States.

Demographically, the United States achieved to close the gaps between native-born and immigrant students as gaps were smaller than gaps in peer nations. There has been a misconception that socioeconomic achievement gaps in the U.S. were much larger than those in the rest of the world as three percent American children from poor families were top performers in reading, compared with an average of four percent of poor children among Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development [O.E.C.D.] countries.
Indeed, the U.S. Education Systems has gradually declined since the beginning of 2000.
Educational researcher will need to dig deep to establish a nationwide curriculum [s] that in critical to providing quality or superior education of both public and private. The Common Core Standard curriculum could prove to be successful if each school districts across the nation would embrace it; developing highly rich content and teaching materials that would attract the attention of public and private school students.

Betsy DeVos at risk of subpoena after refusing to testify before House education panel

Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos has refused to testify before the House Of Education and Labor Committee regarding her department collecting on student loan debt from former Corinthian College students, despite a subpoena from House Democrats. Committee Chairman Bobby Scott [D-Va.] had given Secretary of Education DeVos until 6:00 p.m. to respond to the committee that she appear. The House Democrats are scheduled to hold a hearing on November 19 on the Education Department’s “refusal to provide debt relief” to students “who were defrauded” by the now defunct for-profit chain Corinthian Colleges, according to the hearing posting. The department had admitted that it mistakenly collected on 1600 students who burrowed loan from the for-profits Corinthian Colleges.
Ms. DeVos last month was held in contempt of court imposing a fine of $100,00 for violating an order to stop collecting on student loans from Corinthian Colleges.

In response to Ms. DeVos refusal to stop collection on student loans, House Democrat Chairman Scott sent Ms. DeVos a letter on November the 1 compelling that she appears voluntarily or the committee but to bring in its legal authority to settle the matter. However, before Mr. Scott November 1 letter, the department acting general counsel Reed Rubinstein wrote Mr. Scott saying that Education Secretary wasn’t able to testify citing “active litigation.” Despite of Mr. Scott follow-up letter saying the Ms. DeVos was the only appropriate Education Department witness to testify in this matter, Ms. DeVos in a letter release from the Department to Mr. Scott suggested, “ You and I have a conversation’ either in-person or over the phone at your convince about harrowing defense claims. She contend that she had originally suggest an in-person briefing with Scott and Mark Brown, the Head of Federal Student Loan because of the complexity in the case.

Ms. DeVos perception is that the back-and-forth letter seems to “do little to advance public good.” She contends that his letter suggests a basic “misunderstanding of the state of play.” Thus, she added the department wants to process student claims and “what we need is a swift action from the court.” Speaking as counsel of the Education Department, Rubinstein wrote in a letter to Chairman Scott that the department is adverse to the Secretary appearing before the committee at some point relatively near future to testify regarding Borrower Defense. Rubinstein posits that ti would be only appropriate after the committee heard from Mark Brown, and after the 9th Circuit Court District of Appeals renders a final decision based on merit of the case in pending appeal.

Considering the matter of collecting on Student Loans from for-profit Corinthian Colleges after graduates have defaulted on their loans and the due process that is expected to solve this matter, students will continued to be pressured to payback outstanding loans. As difficult as it is to finding substantial employment, it would be almost near impossible to pay off loan debts.

Bullying has become a serious problem today. Whether occurring on social media-Facebook in the workplace-harassment, or in schools it is infringement on one’s human rights. Linda Brown-Robinson of Syracuse/Onondaga NAACP who is the branch president told CNN affiliate WWNY that she “doesn’t know why people thinks that it’s acceptable to allow things in their presence or do things in the presence of others that are racially motivate…that is a learned behavior, they didn’t just get up that morning and decide they were going to whoop on a young person of color,” Brown-Robinson said. The NAACP president of Syracuse /Onandaga was speaking about an incident of a 10-year old African-American female student who was bullied on a school bus-First Student by two white girls 10 and 11 years old. In a deposition which the 10-year old African American student wrote that on September 9th while on the First Student bus a 10-year African American girl was asked by a white girl what was her first name in which she refused to tell. Then, the white girl asked what was her last name, what grade was she. Again, she refused answer. The white girl then kicked her on the right knee.

The next day, the 10-year old African American [victim] wrote that the same White girl was accompanied by another girl. The two girls discussed how the victim tried to fight the day before. The victim wrote that she “did not want to fight anyone.” An exchanged of words begin which one of the white girls to describe the victim as the [N-Word] while her compliance called the victim a [b three***ch]. The First Student Bus policy employs monitors for their buses as a hiring practice. Ms. Tiffany Spicer 38 was a monitor witnessed the entire episode and didn’t do anything about it. The victim wrote, “Tiffany did not do anything to keep me safe.”

Sargent Darren Fairbank of Gouverneur who was called on the case, wrote in his deposition that the surveillance video showed Ms. Spicer did go to the back of the bus but didn’t do anything to stop the attack and did nothing when one of the white female student yelled the N-Word. The victim wrote. “she did nothing to stop the attack, but said, “You guys are worse than my children.”

SGT Fairbanks also wrote the surveillance video showed a girl pulling the victims hair saying twice that “(N-word) always start it” and then “I like my people, but I don’t like your people.” White this incident took place another a male student came to help the African-America girl [victim] get off the bus

After police investigation, the two girls 10 and 11 were arrested and charged with one-count of aggravated harassment. The 11 year old girl was also charged with aggravated assault and third degree hate crime which is a felony. Spicer, the bus monitor was charged with three counts of endangering the welfare of a child on Monday because police said she witnessed the assault, but “did not make any effort to stop and/or prevent said behavior.”

Appalled by the report about “the 20-minute race assault,” Gov Andrew Cuomo said in a statement on Wednesday, that this was allegedly perpetrated by her own classmates, on a school bus with an adult monitor present, makes this incident even more shocking and troubling,” he said.

Gov. Cuomo said that he is directing the New York State Division of Human Rights [DHR] to open an investigation into the school bus attack and to take legal action to the fullest extent of the law against the perpetrators.”

The Gouverneur Central School District superintendent, Lauren French told CNN affiliate WWNY that the school is planning to have sessions to educate students on bullying and race as well as separate ones for the community at large.

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